Category Archives: Uncategorized

Arduino 1176 Compressor

For the embedded electronics class I am currently taking at Pasadena City College PCC, I am working on building a arduino controlled 1176 compressor. Well mostly an 1176. The gain reductions section is a duplicate of the 1176. The output section is going to be a 2520 DOA. In order to get a very fast attack time instead of sampling the audio and looking for it to go over a threshold, I am doing it by using an interrupt that is triggered by a comparator.

Here is the case design as of last weekend, I still need to add a few controls.

micro 1176

Here is the gain reduction section PCB that I ordered from OSHPark.

Screenshot 2016-04-06 17.29.37

Atari Punk Console

So here it is the final presentation. This is a complete over view of what goes into building an Atari Punk Console. I used Autodesk Maya to render the parts and show the assembly of the PCB, as well as the electrons flowing around the PCB. The videos was edited together in Adobe Premier. Bay Area Circuits manufactured the PCBs and I got the parts for assembly at Frys electronics. The total build cost was about $15, and took about 10 min to do the assembly.

The Atari Punk console is an astable square wave oscillator driving a monostable oscillator that creates a single pulse. The two controls, are for the frequency of the oscillator and one to control the width of the pulse. The controls are usually potentiometer but the circuit can also be controlled by light, temperature, pressure etc. by replacing a potentiometer with a suitable sensor (e.g., photo resistor for light sensitivity). Most of the time there is also a power switch (often a toggle switch) and a volume knob.

 

 

Background on the Atari Punk Console:

The Atari Punk Console (commonly shortened to APC) is a popular circuit that utilizes two 555 timer ICs or a single 556 dual timer IC. The original circuit, called a “Sound Synthesizer”, was published in a Radio Shack booklet: “Engineer’s Notebook: Integrated Circuit Applications” in 1980 and later called “Stepped Tone Generator” in “Engineer’s Mini-Notebook – 555 Circuits” by its designer, Forrest M. Mims III (Siliconcepts, 1984). It was named “Atari Punk Console” (APC) by Kaustic Machines crew because its “low-fi” sounds resemble classic Atari console games from the 1980s, with a square wave output similar to the Atari 2600. Kaustic Machines added a -4db line level output to the circuit which was originally designed to drive a small 8 ohm speaker.

~ Wikipedia

 

Atari Punk Console
These are the raw pcbs from bay area circuits
First we start by installing the DIP Sockets
First we start by installing the DIP Sockets
Adding the resistors
Adding the resistors
Adding the capacitors
Adding the capacitors
Adding the pin header and 9v battery snap
Adding the pin header and 9v battery snap
Added the 1M pot.
Adding the 1M pot.

AB-Y Pedal Version 2

So I am building another AB-Y pedal for a friend he just got a Fender Bass VI. So he wants to have one output go to his bass amp and one output go to his guitar pedals.  As of right now I am currently in the initial schematic stage.  Features:

AB-Y

Mosfet boost

Variable Low Cut

Trim control of outputs

As you can see on the schematic I have all the different parts of the schematic broken out to headers so that you can easily configure this in various ways.

 

Screenshot 2014-11-27 15.46.27

Sorry it been so quite around here I have been keeping my self rather busy of late. But here is an update on one of the projects that I have been working on.

I am in the process of building four NV73 microphone preamps for someone local. This is a really cool kit, I would not recommend it as a your first microphone preamp kit to build as it is rather complex and can take a bit of trouble shooting.  Here are some photos of the build. I currently have two finished and two more to complete.

 

Here are all four units after the first round of building
Here are all four units after the first round of building
Watching the Fifth element and working
Watching the Fifth element and working

Build Progress

Now with transformers
Now with transformers
All four units mocked up
All four units mocked up
I hate these connectors
I hate these connectors
NV73 microphone preamp
NV73 microphone preamp
NV73 microphone preamp
NV73 microphone preamp

AEA Studio Rebuild

Hey everyone long time no see, been keeping busy like usual.  I thought that I would just check in an let you know what I have been up to of late.  Recently I have been rebuilding the recording studio space at AEA.  This all started because I got a MCI JH16 8track 1inch tape machine and needed some where to put it.  My boss ( Wes Dooley ) was nice enough to let me put it at work up in the front room.  Part of the condition was that I put the time in so that we could easily record and play back most formats of audio be it tape or digital.

So, the live room is also AEA shipping and receiving room, it is a good sized space that has been well treated.  There are 19 pairs of old Belden cable coming from the live room up to the front control room. Currently 16 of those lines end in DB25 connectors that are plugged into and API lunch box.  From the outputs of the lunch box it goes into a patch-bay  normalled into a Lynx Aurora 16.

AEA also owns a Studer A810 2 track machine, which is also hooked into the patch-bay for mix downs.  We have a bench mark 2 channel interface that I am planning on putting into the mix as well for high quality stereo conversion be it tape or records as well as sending stereo mixes to the A810.   I am planning on moving the Studer 961 8 channel console we have as well for mixing of the 8 track MCI machine.

Here are some photos of pertinent things:

MCI JH16 1" MCI isn’t working to well

Here is a video of the studio. Playing audio from the record, then I am recording it onto tape and monitoring it back through the Lynx.

Studio Video